Dianne Durham: A Career That Mattered

Dianne Durham is widely remembered as a trailblazer who paved the way for future black Olympians. But the truth is, Dianne Durham was far more than that. Dianne Durham didn’t just set up other black gymnasts to have future success, Dianne Durham exemplified the highest standards of success and black excellence three decades before Gabby Douglas. To this day Dianne Durham remains one of the most talented black gymnasts the sport has ever seen. It could be argued she was the most talented American of the entire 1981-1984 quad.

Don’t believe me? Well consider this…

In 1981 Dianne Durham won the Junior National Championships. In 1982 she won the Junior National Championships for the second time in a row. Then in 1983 she won the National Championships in her senior debut while also winning a critical international competition, the 1983 Pre-Olympics. Then in 1984 the United States held a dual meet with China. This event was designed to see how their Olympic candidates would perform in international competition on the eve of the Olympics. Dianne Durham won that competition as well, beating six Olympians in the process.

When Durham was around the age of 12-13, she competed in apartheid South Africa and took the top prize with a dominating margin of victory of 1.45 points. It goes without saying that Dianne Durham wasn’t the type of gymnast to get rattled while competing in unfavorable circumstances.

It’s not so much a crazy notion to proclaim Dianne Durham was the greatest American gymnast of the early 1980s, but an honest assessment proven by the results themselves. Eventual 1984 Olympic All-Around Champion Mary Lou Retton had actually lost to Dianne Durham a majority of the time the two gymnasts faced each other. Adding credence to the notion that Dianne Durham had strong potential to dominate the 1984 Olympics.

Three decades before Gabby Douglas, a black gymnast hadn’t just paved the way for future black gymnasts to have success, but had achieved the highest level of success herself. Dianne Durham was every bit as good as Gabby Douglas. The only difference between the two gymnasts, Gabby Douglas was able to demonstrate her talent on the world stage whereas Durham was denied that opportunity.

Dianne Durham

The general public would never come to know this story because Dianne Durham never appeared in an Olympic Games. Dianne was rendered ineligible for the 1984 Olympic team due to a poorly designed selection procedure that didn’t do enough to account for a scenario where a top gymnast had to withdraw from a qualifying competition due to injury. Further adding to the problem was conflicting accounts as to how precisely Dianne Durham was able to withdraw from a key qualifying competition without it being properly explained to her that by doing so, it would cost her a spot on the Olympic team.

It went down as one of the most infamous moments in USA Gymnastics history that its top-ranked athlete had been eliminated from the Olympic team on a technicality. Even more so considering the racial dynamics involved as it had occurred in regards to a black athlete in a predominately white sport. To this day the exact specifics of how this was even allowed to happen remain cloudy and I have seen coaches blame other coaches, USAG blame the U.S. Olympic Committee, and senior officials blame Bela Karolyi.

As for Dianne’s opinion on the topic of race impacting her career, in 2020 she said the following:

“In my own life and gymnastics career I encountered discrimination and prejudice. It didn’t stop me from reaching all of my goals, but it did play a role in preventing me from reaching some of my biggest goals. I have been blessed to have had the support of family and friends of all races to help me get through the tough times.”

Not only is Dianne Durham statistically one of the most successful black gymnasts who has ever worn an American leotard, she also ranks as one of the program’s most successful gymnasts to have never appeared in a World Championships or Olympic Games. In doing so, Dianne Durham is the rare example of an American gymnast whose career fits a profile similar to that of Tatiana Groshkova. One of the causalities of a sport where a high injury rate combined with short careers create scenarios where a fan favorite never appears in a major competition.

Dianne Durham represented the very best gymnastics had to offer, both inside the gym and outside of it. Her interviews were always filled with positivity and she remained dedicated to the sport first in a coaching role and later as a judge. One of the common themes in messages of condolences in regards to her recent passing was everybody being proud to have called her a friend.

Dianne Durham

Dianne Durham once said that being inducted into USAG’s Hall of Fame “would heal some wounds and show me that the federation acknowledges that my career mattered.” It was a reference to the other major slight in Dianne Durham’s career. Just like bureaucratic red tape had rendered Durham ineligible for a spot on the 1984 Olympic team, she was also inexplicably not inducted into the Hall of Fame. This in spite of her status as a former National Champion which gives her a stronger resume than many of the gymnasts who have already been inducted.

But Dianne Durham’s career did matter. Dianne Durham proves that there is more to this sport than simply the gymnasts who appeared in its two most prestigious competitions. That there are plenty of fascinating gymnasts who never appeared in either of them. Dianne was a trailblazer for over a dozen black gymnasts that have since won medals at the World Championships/Olympic level. She proved that not only could a black gymnast have success in gymnastics, but they could rise to the highest level and achieve the top ranking in the American program.

But most importantly, Dianne’s career proved you don’t need to be inducted into a Hall of Fame or appear in a major international competition to leave a legacy. Durham’s legacy speaks for itself. When news of Dianne’s illness and later her death became known to the gymnastics community, the legends of the sport quickly paid tribute to her.

Among them were Marcia Frederick, Daniela Silivas, Hana Ricna, Doris Fuchs, Natalia Yurchenko, Betty Okino, and even Nadia Comaneci herself. Because they all saw Dianne Durham as one of themselves and her passing represented an irreplaceable loss. Dianne Durham may not have the Olympic medals to prove she was one of the most remarkable gymnasts the sport had ever seen, but make no mistake about it, she absolutely was.

Dianne Durham

5 thoughts on “Dianne Durham: A Career That Mattered

  1. FEBRUARY 2, 2021 AT 4:46 PM
    The Dianne Durham situation and the issue at the 1984 Olympic Trials was very open and transparent. Simply stated, the USOC had to approve the selection procedures for the Olympic Team Selection process. If you were in the USGF Nationals and the Trials, you could not petition. Your scores were used to earn your place / rank. Petitions were only allowed if you missed one or both of these events. Dianne was in the last rotation in the final selection process of the trials. She had one event to go, bars. She had a little problem on Vault ( the previous event ) although scored well. But as Karolyi told us, she hurt her ankle. As we prepared for the last event, Mike Milidonis, a USGF Board member and a staffer at the trials ran up to me and told me that Bela was scratching Dianne from bars. I ran to Karolyi and told him he could not scratch her and that she had to do bars… because there were no petitions. He said, Oh she hurt her ankle”… I said, ” ok, have her do bars and drop off.! ” .. she will still make the team even with a point deduction, she was in 3rd or 4th place at the time ! We told Karolyi this and what he had to do and this was stated to him by 3 USGF staff / and judges as well as Shiela Walker, the representative of the USOC! I said “Bela, this is not Rumania… no petitions… she will lose her chance to be on the team…”
    Bela did not listen to any of us even when we pleaded to him to have her do bars. So Dianne took a zero on the event. It dropped her below tenth place. In the press conference afterwards, Bela was asked why he scratched Dianne. He mentioned her sore ankle… then said, ” I am sure the Olympic Committee will put her on the team.” Shiela Walker from the USOC followed Bela and said, ” we told him the ramifications if he pulled her off bars… there are no petitions onto the Olympic Team!” I am of the opinion that Bela did not want Dianne on the team because she was one of our best Gymnasts and could win. From someone who always understood the politics, Karolyi used politics against Dianne. As far as the race issue goes, I have said this many time… Dianne won 2 Junior Nationals and the USGF Senior Nationals in 1983… because she was the best ! Thats why she won !!! Dianne was treated like all the athletes, except by Karolyi. If Dianne had done bars, she would have made the team. And, she might have beaten Mary Lou… who knows..
    This was a flawed selection process. It had been used in yers previously and everyone knew how it worked. When Bart Conner was injured in 1984 and dropped out of the National Championships, his scores in the Olympic Trials would could 100% against his ranking. Everyone who competed in the Nationals , especially the top 6, had an advantage over Bart. In the Final Olympic Trials, Bart scores placed him in the top 6 against all the other who had two competitors to earn their place. He made the team and Became a Two time Olympic Champion. If Karolyi had let Dianne do bars, she would have made the team. Who knows what might have happened if she did. As sad and disappointing as this was, the problem was not the process. It was the decision by one person. That is something I will always question and wonder about… especially now !

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  2. Mike Jacki
    FEBRUARY 5, 2021 AT 6:17 PM ( with some corrections )
    FEBRUARY 2, 2021 AT 4:46 PM
    The Dianne Durham situation and the issue at the 1984 Olympic Trials was very open and transparent. Simply stated, the USOC had to approve the selection procedures for the Olympic Team Selection process. If you were in the USGF Nationals and the Trials, you could not petition. Your scores were used to earn your place / rank. Petitions were only allowed if you missed one or both of these events. Dianne was in the last rotation in the final selection process of the trials. She had one event to go, bars. She had a little problem on Vault ( the previous event ) although scored well. But as Karolyi told us, she hurt her ankle. As we prepared for the last event, Mike Milidonis, a USGF Board member and a staffer at the trials ran up to me and told me that Bela was scratching Dianne from bars. I ran to Karolyi and told him he could not scratch her and that she had to do bars… because there were no petitions. He said, Oh she hurt her ankle”… I said, ” ok, have her do bars and drop off ! .. she will still make the team even with a point deduction !” She was in 3rd or 4th place at the time ! We told Karolyi this and what he had to do and this was stated to him by 3 USGF staff / and judges as well as Shiela Walker, the representative of the USOC! I said “Bela, this is not Rumania… no petitions… she will lose her chance to be on the team…!! ”
    Bela did not listen to any of us even when we pleaded to him to have her do bars. So Dianne took a zero on the event. It dropped her below tenth place. In the press conference afterwards, Bela was asked why he scratched Dianne. He mentioned her sore ankle… then said, ” I am sure the Olympic Committee will put her on the team.” Shiela Walker from the USOC followed Bela and said, ” we told him the ramifications if he pulled her off bars… there are no petitions onto the Olympic Team!” I am of the opinion that Bela did not want Dianne on the team because she was one of our best Gymnasts and could win. From someone who always understood the politics, Karolyi used politics against Dianne. As far as the race issue goes, I have said this many time… Dianne won 2 Junior Nationals and the USGF Senior Nationals in 1983… because she was the best ! Thats why she won !!! Dianne was treated like all the athletes, except by Karolyi. If Dianne had done bars, she would have made the team. And, she might have beaten Mary Lou… who knows..
    This was NOT a flawed selection process. It had been used in years previously and everyone knew how it worked. When Bart Conner was injured in 1984 and dropped out of the National Championships, his scores in the Olympic Trials would count 100% against his ranking. Everyone who competed in the Nationals , especially the top 6, had an advantage over Bart. In the Final Olympic Trials, Bart scores placed him in the top 6 against all the other who had two competitions to earn their place. He made the team and became a Two time Olympic Champion. If Karolyi had let Dianne do bars, she would have made the team. Who knows what might have happened if she did. As sad and disappointing as this was, the problem was not the process. It was the decision by one person. That is something I will always question and wonder about… especially now !

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    REPLY

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  3. Great gymnast and athlete as I was able to see Diane compete on national television. A super power house!

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  4. It was well known that Don Peters did not want Dianne on the Olympic team too. He thought that the judges would not score a Black gymnast well. A horrible and racist thought to have. However, with Mr. Peters it looks like he was far from a stellar example of how a coach or anyone for that matter should conduct themselves.

    Why did it take so long to ban Don Peters? Not stopping Don Peters when it was known what he was doing in the 1980’s led to Larry Nasser and others. The abuse of gymnasts went back to the 1980’s. Shame on everyone in a position of power who ignored it.

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