Elena Gurova

Total Medals:
Olympics:
Worlds:
Euros:
World Cup:
Appearances:undefined

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Elena Gurova was one of the most high-octane junior prospects to have ever existed. She was the first gymnast to successfully complete a DTY in a competition and did so at the 1984 DTB Cup when she was only 11 years old. At this very same competition Gurova shared first place with Maxi Gnauck while Simona Pauca finished 3rd. In doing so the young Gurova had tied the AA-bronze medalist of the 1984 Alternate Olympics, while beating the AA-bronze medalist of the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics. In an Olympic year when she was only 11 years old.

Gurova continued to perform well over the next three years and was a member of the 1987 Soviet World Championships team. However she continued to slow down as she transitioned to the senior level and by 1988 had reached the point where she was unable to make the Soviet Olympic team. Elena Gurova was only 15 when she appeared in her last major competition.

World Championships & Olympic Competition:

Results:

1984:
Moscow News: Competed as a reserve.
undefined Druzhba: 2nd-AA, 1st-VT (T), 3rd-UB, 1st-FX
undefined URS-GDR Dual Meet (Junior): 1st-AA, 1st-UB, 1st-BB, 1st-FX, 1st-Team
DTB Cup: 1st-AA (T), 1st-VT, 3rd-UB, 1st-BB (T), 2nd-FX

1985:
Army Club Championships: 4th-AA, 1st-VT, 1st-FX
undefined Druzhba: 1st-AA, 1st-UB, 1st-Team
Champions All: 9th-AA

1986:
Ahoy Cup: 2nd-AA, 1st-VT (T), 3rd-FX
USSR Spartakiade: 3rd-AA, 3rd-VT, 2nd-UB, 2nd-FX

1987:
Moscow News: 3rd-AA, 1st-VT, 2nd-UB, 2nd-BB
World Sports Fair: 1st-AA (T)
USSR Cup: 2nd-AA, 3rd-UB, 2nd-BB, 1st-FX
USSR Championships: 4th-AA
World Championships: 2nd-Team
Chunichi Cup: 1st-AA
Tokyo Cup: 1st-VT, 2nd (T)

1988:
USSR Championships: 14th-AA, 1st-Team
World Sports Fair: 1st-AA
USSR Cup: 10th-AA, 7th-VT, 6th-BB (T), 7th-FX

Gallery:

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Results are taken from Score for Score, The Gymternet, GymnasticGreats, My Meet Scores, Gymn-Forum, the official websites of various national gymnastics federations, newspaper clippings, classic gymnastics magazines, and in some cases, were provided by the gymnasts themselves. An explanation for the meaning of these undefined symbols can be found here.

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